Philosophy

My teaching methods are designed to strengthen students’ critical thinking skills and resourcefulness. My goal in teaching is to enforce three qualities I deem critical for success in any professional field:

  1. an appreciation and preference for information free of potential bias,
  2. systematic, critical questioning of the assumptions that lay the foundation of your worldview, and
  3. the ability to seek out answers and solutions that may not be readily accessible.

I have taught a number of courses at undergraduate and graduate levels. I have also co-instructed a number of intensive week-long trainings on the use of open source software for processing of massive spatial datasets. A select list of these courses and workshops is provided below.


Courses

Spring 2019 - Forest Ecosystem Management and Planning, U.C. Berkeley, Graduate Student Instructor.

Spring 2018 - Introduction to the Methods of Environmental Science, U.C. Berkeley, Graduate Student Instructor.

Spring 2017 - Resource Management, U.C. Berkeley, Graduate Student Instructor.

Spring 2016 - Sampling Methodology and Practice, Yale University, Teaching Fellow.


Workshops

Spring 2019 - Massive geocomputation using open source software, Yale University, Co-Instructor

Spring 2019 - GDAL/OGR software, GeoMatters Working Group, UC-Berkeley, Instructor

Summer 2018 - Massive geocomputation using open source software, UC-Berkeley, Co-Instructor

Spring 2018 - Massive geocomputation using open source software, Yale University, Co-Instructor